Getting a Settlement After a Blind Spot Truck Accident

Settlement After a Blind Spot Truck Accident

Written by Jeremy D. Earle, JD

July 5, 2022

Blind Spot Truck Accident Law Firm

While you may not be familiar with the word “no-zone,” you are probably familiar with the concept of “blind spots.” The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has designated heavy truck blind areas as “no-zones” since 1991. To put it another way, no-zones are blind regions where a truck driver cannot see an car. Other drivers must be continually mindful of these risky places.

Blind spots occur in every car, but because of their enormous weight and size, they put drivers in significantly more danger while driving heavy trucks. Below, we go through no- zones in further depth.

ACCIDENTS IN NO-ZONE ZONES: RESEARCH

Numerous research on no-zone collisions has been carried out. In no-zones, many traffic accidents between a car and a truck occurred. Drivers need to be aware of these zones to stay safe while sharing the road with large trucks.

There are truck no-zones in the following locations:

FRONT OF THE TRUCK

The front no-zone accounts for up to 13% of all accidents between a car and truck.

TRUCK SIDE

Side no-zone accidents account for 12% of all truck-car collisions. Intersections are the most typical location for these collisions.

REAR OF THE TRUCK

Rear no-zones are responsible for 10% of all car-truck accidents.

Overall, nearly 35 percent of all truck accidents involving smaller cars may be traced back to a no-zone collision. According to estimates, around 30,000 car and truck accidents occur each year due to no-zone collisions.

RECOGNIZING NO-ZONE AREAS

 

Because a truck is bigger than a car, it’s natural to think that truck drivers have a greater field of vision of what’s on the road. Even though a truck’s front view is broader, you may be surprised to realize how difficult it is for a truck driver to see effectively on all sides of the car.

The following are the four places where a motorist is least likely to notice an oncoming car:

CARS BEHIND THE TRUCK’S TRAILER

Truck drivers have trouble spotting cars behind them. While this should come as no surprise, the distance between these obstacles may surprise you. Most guidelines indicate that cars stay at least 30 feet behind a truck’s trailer.

FRONT OF THE TRUCK CAB

Truck drivers may find it difficult to see what is directly in front of them. This is because they are trying to see over the cab’s nose, which is far bigger than the front end of most cars. According to most studies, to keep out of their no-zones, trucks need cars to stay at least 20 feet ahead of them.

TRUCK’S LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES

These are grouped since the guidelines for avoiding difficulties are the same. Truckers are unable to see under their cab mirrors. This problem may extend to a somewhat broader radius on the right side of the car.

Checking the car’s mirror is a basic rule of thumb when dealing with the right and left sides. If you can’t see the driver, you can’t see the driver!

Driving cautiously isn’t always the best approach to prevent no-zone collisions. Staying attentive, being aware that you’re sharing the road with a truck with potentially wide blind spots, and making efforts to ensure the truck driver can see you clearly may all assist in lessening the likelihood of a no-zone collision.

WHAT LEADS TO A NO-ZONE COLLISION?

When sharing the road with other drivers, it’s crucial to remember that they all have blind areas. When sharing the road with trucks, the truck’s blind zones are often greater, making it more difficult for the driver to see you. When passing a heavy truck on the road, drivers should drive cautiously and care.

It’s also worth keeping in mind that a truck isn’t as elegant as a car. Due to the sheer size, drivers need more time to come to a complete stop, and defensive maneuvers might be dangerous. According to the FHMCA, it takes a truck going at 65 miles per hour to two football fields to come to a full stop. If the roads are wet, the journey may take much longer.

 

While many of us have seen labels on huge trucks reminding us of their blind areas, there are a few more things that all drivers should be aware of:

FALLING DEBRIS

Following a truck too closely may be just as deadly as a no-zone collision. A truck may toss debris from the road into the path of your car. Debris or incorrectly laden goods may also fall from truck beds.

PASSING TRUCKS ON THE RIGHT SIDE

Drivers who try to pass on the right side of a truck should exercise extra care. Keep in mind that a truck needs extra room to perform a right-hand turn safely. If you find yourself in the truck’s no-zone when the driver turns, the consequences might be fatal.

Trucks are just not as maneuverable as passenger cars. This puts heavy trucks in danger of colliding with other cars on the road, especially in bad weather.

TRUCK WEIGHTS PLAY A ROLE IN INJURIES

Most individuals are aware that various variables influence the severity of injuries sustained in a car accident. The speed at which the cars are moving, the road conditions, the time of day, and the collision location are all variables to consider. Another aspect to consider is the combined weight of the cars involved. This is particularly true when a truck is one of the cars involved in a collision.

Here’s a short rundown of the weight differences between several kinds of cars:

STANDARD CARS

The weight of an empty passenger car may range between 3,200 and 6,000 pounds. The car might weigh up to 1,000 pounds more when fully loaded.

COMPACT TRUCKS

When empty, SUVs, minivans, and small pickup trucks may weigh 2,400 to 4,000 pounds. These trucks have an enhanced payload capacity of 1,500 pounds.

LARGER PASSENGER TRUCKS

Even when empty, larger SUVs and standard or large-sized pickup trucks may weigh anywhere from 6,000 to 10,000 pounds. The freight capacity of these cars ranges from 2,500 to 5,000 pounds.

SMALL BUSES AND UTILITY CARS

 

These cars already weigh more than a conventional passenger car when empty, weighing between 10,000 and 14,000 pounds. With an extra 5,200 pounds of freight, vans and buses weigh almost twice as much as a typical car.

TRACTOR-TRAILERS

These behemoths weigh anywhere from 33,000 to 80,000 pounds before any cargo is loaded. Trucks may be hauling an extra 54,000 pounds, depending on the load.

These figures demonstrate that getting involved in a truck accident is likely to be disastrous regardless of the kind of car you are driving. In the case of a truck collision, trucks have a considerable weight advantage, placing every other driver on the road at a disadvantage.

INJURIES INVOLVED IN TRUCK ACCIDENTS

While there are no conclusive statistics on how often truck accidents occur in no-zone accidents, we do know a few things. For starters, truck accidents may leave victims with serious injuries. In addition, we have a thorough understanding of some of the most prevalent injuries resulting from a truck collision.

Some of the injuries that may occur in a no-zone collision include:

SERIOUS HEAD INJURIES

Truck accidents may result in traumatic brain injury (TBI), concussions, and broken skulls. Victims of these injuries may have to heal for weeks or months. A TBI may cause lasting injure to individuals in certain situations. Some victims may have personality changes, inability to think clearly, and other ailments that make returning to regular life more difficult.

BACK AND NECK INJURIES

Soft tissue injuries, vertebral compression, and spinal cord injuries may all negatively influence your life. You may face lifelong nerve damage and other difficulties in addition to severe pain. Unfortunately, these injuries may not necessarily show up right away after an accident; instead, they may occur over a few days.

OTHER SEVERE INJURIES

Shattered glass cuts, airbag and seatbelt injuries, broken bones, and internal injuries are all frequent after a car collision. Any form of damage, including surgical treatments, persistent pain, and more, might lead to future issues.

It is critical to seek medical attention as soon as possible following an injury. You want to make sure there aren’t any acute problems that might worsen over time. Victims who have been in a no-zone accident and are feeling OK should watch themselves for many days after

 

the event and seek medical help immediately if they experience any discomfort. Remember that our bodies are good at hiding discomfort, especially when we’re under a lot of pressure.

DEALING WITH THE FACTS: FINANCIAL CONCERNS AFTER NO- ZONE ACCIDENTS

Most no-zone accident victims are concerned about various issues while they recuperate from their injuries. Suppose you’ve been injured in a no-zone collision. In that case, you’re probably worried about missing work, mounting medical expenses, the state of your car, and the stress of knowing that your injuries may lead to future medical difficulties.

Meanwhile, in the back of your mind, you’re worried about how much your accident will cost you and your family financially.

This is when you consider how you will work with the insurance company to recoup financially. Before you do anything, speak with a lawyer who has dealt with transportation accidents.

IMPORTANT THINGS TO THINK ABOUT AFTER A NO-ZONE ACCIDENT

The procedure of filing a truck accident claim is difficult. One of the first things you need to figure out is who is to blame for the accident. It’s tempting to believe you’re somewhat to blame, but no matter what you do, never apologize or confess any culpability, especially while interacting with police enforcement or insurance agents.

Do not make any statements to these parties until you’ve consulted with a truck accident attorney who is looking out for your best interests.

Additional factors may have contributed to the no-zone collision, so drivers should consider that. A lawyer can assist you in investigating and identifying these factors. For example, the truck driver may have been sleeping deprived, transporting cargo that was too heavy for their cars, or driving too quickly for the circumstances.

All drivers are at risk of being impaired by drugs or alcohol, driving excessively quickly, or driving while distracted. Adjusters sometimes attempt to blame patients for their injuries after starting the insurance claim process. This is a frequent strategy used by insurance firms to safeguard their bottom lines, which includes paying as few claims as possible.

There’s a considerable possibility you’ll be dealing with many insurance adjusters. In most circumstances, insurance companies will assign one adjuster to medical claims and another to property damage claims (the damage to your car or other belongings.)

 

If you have a large truck accident claim, you may get a speedy settlement offer from an insurance company. Do not be fooled into signing your initial settlement offer; this is a frequent practice used by insurance firms to avoid responsibility in the future.

If you’ve suffered a catastrophic injury, the insurance adjuster understands that you don’t know when you’ll be able to return to work, how expensive your total medical costs will be, or what the long-term consequences of your condition will be. They’ll put pressure on you to make a rapid decision, and you’ll be out of luck.

An attorney with experience with complex no-zone accident cases can assist you by reviewing your medical records and engaging specialists to estimate your lost wages and overall recuperation time. Your lawyer is there to look out for you and your interests. Your attorney will manage insurance discussions and be ready to take your case to trial if necessary while you concentrate on your rehabilitation.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a no-zone collision, you must move quickly to preserve your legal rights. Following a no-zone collision, you must first grasp all of your choices before deciding which is best for you and your family. Get a free consultation from one of our live professionals right now! We’re here to assist you.

Warrior Personal Injury Lawyers
1902 W. Colorado Ave., Ste. 100
Colorado Springs, CO 80904
719-300-1100

Free Consultation

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